2021-10-11

The world can be a scary place sometimes, but it's worth believing in and showing up この世界は時には怖いところだけれど、それでもやっぱり美しくて、それを信じて参加するに値するところ

 

Photo by Jackson David on Unsplash


A few days ago, my mom gave me a call. She said there was no particular reason for the call. "I just wanted to say hi," she said. It was good timing, so we spoke for about a half-hour. 

She and I can talk for hours without any problem. We always have a lot to share, and even if we do not have much to say, we can find something to talk about with any given object that happens to be in front of us. And we are comfortable with silence, too. 

She easily laughs, and her laughter is contagious. 

We talked about various subjects, and at one point, somehow, we stumbled upon a topic, "Talking to strangers." We agreed that neither of us is afraid of talking to strangers, although I am an introvert and love spending time alone. 

From my parents, especially my mother, I learned to trust in people's goodness, regardless of their appearance or social status. 

When I was about four years old, I remember seeing a man with a noticeable scar on his face at the supermarket where my mom and I regularly shopped. We did not see him every time, but we saw him sometimes. He was probably in his 50s or 60s at that time, and he was always by himself. He would say hi, and we said hi back to him. I remember my mom carrying casual conversations with him. I did not see other people talking to him. 

Whenever he said hi to us, my mom did not look bothered or scared. Sometimes, he tried to buy me ice cream, and my mom often politely turned down the offer, but once in a while, I got ice cream, and I remember thanking him and eating it in front of the store before it melted. I remember seeing his eyes were narrowly arching and looking happy, seeing me eating the ice cream. 

In high school, I had eating disorders and crowd phobia, and I barely managed to go to school. But, I was able to go to the Suga Jazz Dance Studio to take dance classes every night. When I danced, I could breath deeply. 

My family lived in an apartment then, located in the central part of the city. It was because my father, an engineer, needed to get to the office immediately during an emergency. Since it was in the middle of a town, it happened to be in the neighborhood of the red-light district (but a safe area). 

I used to go to the dance studio by riding a bicycle. A few hundred yards away from my house stood one of the high-end-looking businesses on the edge of the red-light district. I liked that this business did not have any obnoxious light flickering neon signs. There was always a man in a suit standing in front of the closed door to greet their guests. There were two or three men, and they took turns standing outside. 

I knew what the shop was for, but I did not want to ignore the doorman's presence. I gave them a quick bow whenever I passed by, and they lifted their chins toward me or lifted their hands as if to say, "Hi." Eventually, our nightly recognition turned into verbal greetings, like "Good evening" (when I left for a class) and them responding, "Be careful (of traffic)." When I came home, I said, "Good night," and they replied, "Good night." 

I never stopped to talk to them, but we exchanged minimum information that my bicycle speed allowed. They eventually knew I was going to a dance class and seasonally practicing for Yosakoi (an annual dance festival of my hometown in which the whole town dances). 

Sometimes, their greetings had variations: "Good luck tomorrow! (the night before the festival) or "Oh good, you're home safe" (when I came home later than usual), etc. 

We did not know each other's names; none of us tried to find out. I did not know why they ended up doing that job or why they would greet me. 

But in the lonely world of torturing myself with food and scale, they became my night watchers and provided a ray of moonlight into my dark, cold heart as if to say, "We see you." 

One evening, my mom and I happened to go out together on the bicycles. When we passed in front of the business, we both greeted the doorman. He looked at us and laughed as if to say, "Ah, you two are related! Makes sense!" 

My mom and I also looked at each other and said, "You've been greeting them, too?" Then we laughed. I was impressed by my mom once again for being their regular greeters. 

Also, no one was standing there during the daytime, so sometimes, I wondered if they existed. I was happy to know that my mom knew of these nightly appearing souls, too. 

These are only two examples, but I have many more episodes of my mother making friends with strangers, including "outsiders" with whom other people did not seem to want to be associated. 

From my mother, I learned to look into the "luminous place" flowing deep within each of us and meet people in that place. 

From my mother, I learned that the world can be a scary place sometimes, but it's worth believing in and showing up.

------------(Japanese)-------------

数日前母が電話をくれた。 特に用事はないのだけどと言って。 タイミングが良かったので、そのまま30分ほど話した。 

母と私は何時間でも話そうと思えば話せる。 話題は尽きない。尽きたとしても、たまたま目の前にある物を題材にでもしてまた数時間話せる。でも話していないと一緒にいられないというわけでもない。(ちゃんと二人で静かにしていることもできます。) 

母は会話の節々でよく笑うし、本当に楽しそうに笑うので聞いている方も笑いたくなる。 

色々なことを話していくうちに、「知らない人に話しかける」という話題になった。そして二人ともそれについては問題なしと合意した。私はけっこう内向型で一人の時間が大好きだけれど、出かけた先で知らない人に話しかけることに躊躇しない方だ。それは母から譲り受けたものだろう。 

両親から、特に母からは、外見や社会的地位に惑わされずに人々の良心を信じて出会っていくということを学んだ。 

私が4歳くらいのとき、いつも母と買い物をしていたスーパーで時々会うおじさんがいた。当時50代か60代くらいで、顔に傷跡があり、ちょっと強面なおじさんだった。いつも一人だった。挨拶をし、母は迷惑にも面倒に思う振りも見せずおじさんと会話をしたけれど、他の人と話しているところを見たことがなかった。

おじさんは時々私にアイスクリームを買ってくれようとしたのだけど、母が丁寧にお断りをした。それでも年に数回は買ってもらった覚えがある。とけないうちにとスーパーの外で食べる私を、おじさんは目を細めてうれしそうに見ていたのを覚えている。 

高校生のときは摂食障害があったため、学校には卒業をするために必要な日数を確保するためかろうじて行くという状態であった。でも夜になると、ダンスクラスを取るため、スガジャズダンススタジオには毎晩のように通えていた。踊っているときだけちゃんと息をできるような気がした。 

その頃、私たち家族は町の中心に位置するマンションに住んでいた。エンジニアの父が緊急の際にすぐ出社できるようにという理由から。そして町の中心地はピンク街の近くでもあった。(治安は良かったです。) 

ダンススタジオには自転車で通っていた。家から数百メートル離れたところに、ピンク街の端に位置する少し高級感のあるお店があった。このお店は目がチカチカするようなネオンのサインがないという点では好印象だった。閉まったドアの前にはいつも誰かしらスーツ姿のお兄さんが、お客様をお出迎えするために立っていた。3人くらいのお兄さん達が日替わりでいたように覚えている。 

その店がどんな店であれ、そのお兄さん達を無視する気になれず通りかかる度に会釈をしていた。するとお兄さん達は顎をひょいっと上げてくれたり、片手を挙げてくれたりした。そのお互いの存在を認知する作業はやがて声を通しての挨拶になり、私の「こんばんは!」(ダンススタジオに行くとき)には「気をつけてな」に。帰ってきたときの私の「おやすみなさい!」には「おやすみ」になっていった。 

一度も自転車を止めて話したことはなかったけれど、自転車のスピードが許す限りの最小限の情報を交換した。私がダンスのレッスンのために夜出ていくことをお兄さんたちは知ったし、夏はよさこい祭りの練習をしていることも知った。 

なのでお兄さんたちの挨拶は時々バリエーションに富むようになった。よさこい祭りの前日には「明日がんばれよ!」と言ってくれたし、いつもより遅く帰ってきたときは、「無事帰ってきたな!」と言ってくれた。 

お互いの名前は知らなかったし、無理に知る必要はないと思った。そのお兄さんたちがどういう経過でその仕事をすることになったのかは分からないし、どうして挨拶してくれるのかも分からなかった。 

でも食べ物と体重計で自分を拷問する孤独な日々の中、彼らは私の「夜守り」として冷たい心に一筋の光を投げかけてくれる存在だった。まるで「おれらは見ているよ」とでも言うかのように。 

ある夜、母と一緒にその店の前を自転車で通りかかることがあった。店の前に来て、母と私は同時に「こんばんは〜」と言った。するとそのお兄さんは私たちを見て、「この母ありてこの娘あり」とでも言わんばかりに笑っていた。親子だったって分かったのだろう。 

私たちも 「お母さんも挨拶してたん!?」 「あかりもしてたん!?」 と二人で笑った。お兄さんたちに挨拶をしていた母のことを誇らしく思った。 

それに昼間はその店の前には誰もいないから、あのお兄さんたちは本当に存在するのかなと思うこともあったから、母もあの「夜現れる人たち」を知っていてうれしくなった。 

これはほんの二つのエピソードだけど、 他の方が見て見ぬ振りするような方々を含めた知らない人たちと、母が打ち解けていく様子を私は多々見て育ってきた。 

母からは人々の根底に流れるキラキラしているところを見つめて出会っていくことの大切さを学んだ。 

そしてこの世界は時には怖いところだけれど、それでもやっぱり美しくて、それを信じて参加するに値するところだということを教えてもらった。

2021-08-23

The 18th Sanjukta Panigrahi Yuva Mahotsav



The world has been going through such turmoil in many aspects, including the pandemic, lives being displaced by armed conflicts, racism, climate issues, and more. Since the beginning of 2020, there have been numerous times when I hesitated to share things, not wanting to cover up other important messages. 

However, today, I would like to humbly share this celebratory news because what my teacher's teacher in India is doing is noteworthy. 

Also, in times like this, I remember what my maternal grandfather, a traditional bamboo weaver, said. "People don't need art to survive, but art makes people's hearts supple and whole and sustain human spirits, so in difficult times, artists need to keep honing their skills and creating art." 

Guru Jhelum Paranjape, whom we affectionately call Jhelumtai ("tai" means elder sister in Marathi, one of the Indian languages), has organized this annual dance festival called "Sanjukta Panigrahi Yuva Mahotsav" through her dance school, Smitalay, since 2004. 

Sanjukta Panigrahi (the lady in black and white in the flyer above) was the foremost exponent of Indian classical dance Odissi. She passed away at age 52 in 1997. Yuva means youth, and mahotsav means festival. Since Sanjuktaji always encouraged young dancers, Jhelumtai started this festival to support newly establishing dancers, presenting nearly all the classical styles. 

Last year and this year, the festival was and is hosted virtually due to the pandemic. When I received a message from one of Jheumtai's senior students, Hemangitai, notifying me that I will be a part of the festival, I could not believe it. 

I scouted possible locations, asked my friend, Kosuke Furukawa to videotape me, and I edited the video. Kosuke said that morning light is the best, so we began shooting at 7 am. I woke up at 4 am and got ready; I had never performed that early in my life. :-D 

Then I experienced a huge learning curve to use DaVinci Resolve, a video editing software. I watched many YouTube videos, read websites, and asked Kosuke and another friend, Stephan Boeker for their guidance over the phone to complete the video. 

Why did I edit it myself? 1) I did not have the funds to hire an editor. 2) I always wanted to learn how to use DaVinci Resolve. Thanks to Jheumtai for this incentive to dive into something new.

One more dive I had to make was to be okay with making my performance video available to the Internet world. With Yosakoi dance (Japanese dance), I had no problem. I've been dancing it since I was a child. I felt I knew what I was doing well enough, and I was satisfied with my performance level. 

But with Odissi, I am only dancing it since 2005, and it takes years and years to learn this classical art form. There are so many incredible dancers, and I have a long way to reach their mastery if I could ever get there. I had to overcome my inner voice and tell myself, "You know what, Akari? You did what you could do as of today. It was your best as of today, so be okay with it. And keep working on it. Being vulnerable is a part of the growth process! You cannot avoid it if you want to grow, and you're not gonna die from it, so get used to it." 

I am grateful to Jhelumtai for believing in me and pushing my back to be on this platform. 

I know that for Hawaii friends, it will be hard to watch it live as it will be 3:30 am (on Tuesday, 8/24). I believe it will be available to be viewed after the live show on FB and YouTube

On the first day, Preetisha Mohapatra, the granddaughter of Padmavibhushan Guru Kelucharan Mohapatra and Sumanjit, a disciple of Guru Aloka Kanungo will be seen. I saw Alokaji's performance in India in 2014, and I had goose bumps.

I am on the second day with Sanatan Chakravarty, another senior disciple of Jhelumtai. I met and got to perform with Sanatan back in 2013. I believe we are close in age, and hearing his story of quitting a stable job to pursue Odissi dance truly inspired me (which I ended up doing the following year). 

I offer a deep bow to Padmashree Sanjukta Panigrahi, Smitalay, Jhelumtai, and the Smitalay friends working behind the scene for this opportunity. (Thank you, Ankur Ballal.) 

And my pranam to my teacher, Sarala Dandekar Vafaie for I am here because of her.

------------------(Japanese)------------------

世界は色々な面で大変な局面を迎えています。パンデミック、武力紛争、人種差別、気候変動などなど。特に2020年に入ってからは、他の大切な情報が埋もれてしまわないよう、「今はこれは投稿しなくてもいいかな」と思いSNSに投稿をためらうことが何度ともありました。

しかし、今日はこの喜ばしいニュースを謹んでシェアさせていただきたいと思います。私の古典舞踊の先生の先生がされていることを紹介するためにも。

またこのようなとき、竹細工職人であった私の母方の祖父が言っていたことを思い出します。
「人は芸術がなくても生きていけるが、芸術は人の心をしなやかに丸くし、人の精神を支えるものだ。困難な時代にこそ、職人や芸術家は技術を磨き、作品を作り続けなければならない。」

私たちが親しみを込めて 「ジェーラムタイ」と呼ぶ(名前の後につく「タイ」はインドのマラーティー語で「お姉さん」という意味)ジェーラム・パランザペ師は、2004年から自身のダンススクール 、Smitalay で「Sanjukta Panigrahi Yuva Mahotsav」というダンスフェスティバルを毎年開催しています。ジェーラムタイは私の先生の先生です。

サンジュクタ・パニグラヒさん(チラシの白黒の写真の女性)は、インド古典舞踊を世に広めたオディッシーの第一人者です。1997年に52歳で亡くなりました。Yuvaは「若者」、mahotsavは「祭り」を意味します。サンジュクタ師が常に若いダンサーを奨励していたことから、ジェーラムタイは新しく芽を出している踊り手たちを応援するためにこのフェスティバルを始め、インドの様々な種類の古典舞踊の踊り手たちを取り上げてきました。(オディッシィダンスは古典舞踊の一つです。)

去年と今年は、パンデミックの影響でフェスティバルはオンライン上で開催されいてます。ジェーラムタイの弟子の一人であるへーマンギさん(私にとっては先輩弟子)から、このフェスティバルに私が参加する旨のメッセージを受け取ったときは、信じられませんでした。

いくつかの場所を偵察し、ふるかわこうすけさんにビデオ撮影を依頼し、私がビデオを編集しました。こうすけさんが「朝の光が一番いい」と言うので、朝7時から撮影を開始しました。朝4時に起きて準備をしましたが、こんなに早い時間に演技をしたことはありませんでした!(笑)

そして、ビデオ編集ソフトDaVinci Resolveの使い方を学ぶのに大変な苦労をしました。YouTubeの動画をたくさん見たり、ウェブサイトを読んだり、こうすけさんや友人のステファンさんに電話越しで教えてもらったりして、ビデオを完成させました。

なぜ自分で編集したのかといいますと、1)編集者を雇う資金がなかったから。2)DaVinci Resolveの使い方を学びたいとずっと思っていたから。ですので、このように新しいことに挑戦するきっかけを作ってくれたジェーラムタイに感謝しています。

もうひとつの挑戦は、自分のパフォーマンス映像をインターネット上で公開するということでした。よさこい踊りなら問題ありませんでした。子供の頃から踊っていましたし、自分のパフォーマンスレベルにも「シェアしてもいいかな」と思うくらいには満足していました。

しかし、オディッシーとなると2005年に始めました。会得するのに長年かかる古典芸術です。たくさんの素晴らしいダンサーがいて、私が彼らの習熟レベルに到達するには(到達できるかすらも分かりませんが)、遠い道のりです。自分の中の不安な気持ちを乗り越えて、このように自分に言い聞かせました。「いい、あかり?あかりは今日できるベストを尽くした。これ以上は今日の時点ではできないというところまでやった。だから、その事実を受け入れなさい。確かに自分の作品が世界中の人の目に留まれるようなところに出ていくというのは、裸で家の外に飛び出していくような気持ちかもしれないけど、それも成長のプロセスの一部。これから成長したかったら、それを避けることはできないし、それによって死ぬこともないから、慣れていきなさい。」この面でも、私を信じて背中を押してくれたジェーラムタイに感謝しています。

ハワイの友達にとっては、このフェスティバルが放送されるのは朝3時半なので(日本のお友達にとっては8月24日と25日の夜10時半からです)、ライブで観るのは難しいと思いますが、放送された後も再度観られるようになっているはずなので、また後日こちらにてリンクを紹介いたします。こちらがSmitalayのYouTubeチャンネルです。

フェスティバルの初日は、オディッシィダンスを近代に復興させることに多大な尽力を尽くされたパドマビブシャン・グル・ケルチャラン・モハパトラの孫娘にあたるプリティシャ・モハパトラさんとグル・アローカ・カヌンゴさんの弟子にあたるスマンジットさんが踊られます。私は2014年にアローカ師の踊りを生で見させていただいて、鳥肌が立ったのを覚えています。

二日目に、ジェーラムタイの弟子の一人のサナタン・チャックラバーティーと私のビデオが放送されます。私は2013年にサナタンに会い、一緒に舞台にも立たせてもらいました。たしか私たちは歳が近かったはず。2013年に会ったとき、オディッシィダンスのために安定した収入源であった銀行のお仕事を辞めたと話されていました。それは私にとって「ほぉ」と鼓舞されるお話でした。そして翌年私も同じ事をすることになったのです。

故パドマシュリ・サンジュクタ・パニグラヒをはじめ、Smitalay、ジェーラムタイ、そしてこのフェスティバルのために舞台裏で色々と作業をしてくださっているSmitalayのみなさまに感謝の意を表します。

最後に、私がこのようなフェスティバルに出させていだくようになった所以である、私の先生サララ・ダンデカー師に深い感謝を申し上げます。

2021-08-08

Springing Memories and Waterfalling Appreciation 湧き出る思い出、滝(たぎ)つ感謝の想い 

Sports Day (elementary school)
小学校の運動会

This morning, my dad emailed me a link to view 426 photos he kindly scanned and uploaded from my childhood (elementary, middle school, and high school years). As I fondly looked at each one, countless memories surfaced like spring water, and when I looked up for a second, I was not sure where I was.

I reminded myself, "I became an adult and am living on the island of Maui." I felt like my childhood was a lifetime ago. Then I used a bathroom; I saw myself in the mirror and felt a fascinating, foreign feeling. I thought to myself, "That girl became this person now," as if I was looking at a neighbor's kid.

Sports Day (middle school)
中学校の運動会

I was detached from my identity and almost objectively perceived her growth over the years. After the nostalgic feeling evaporated, what was left in my heart's "nostalgia lake" was pure appreciation.

I am here today because of all the people who have touched my life - my family, friends, teachers, mentors, neighbors, and those of whom I don't even know their names. The appreciation overwhelmed me like a waterfall and made me cry as I looked at myself in the photos and myself in the mirror.

After a school event, with classmates (middle school)
中学校の何かの学校行事の後でクラスメイトと

---------------(Japanese)--------------

With my rhythmic gymnastics teammates (high school)
高校の新体操部のみんなと

今朝、父からメールがあり、ありがたいことに小学・中学・高校時代の426枚の写真をスキャンしてアップロードし、それらを見られるリンクを送ってくれた。(若い世代の方のために説明しておくと、その頃はまだデジタルではなかったのですよ。)懐かしく一枚一枚を見ていくうちに、色々な思い出が湧き水のように浮上してきた。そして顔を上げたとき、一瞬自分がどこにいるのか分からなかった。

「私は大人になって、今マウイ島で暮らしている。」と自分に思い出させなくてはいけなかった。まるで幼少時代は別の人生のようにさえ思えた。そしてお手洗いに行き、ふと鏡に映る自分を見て、名前の分からない何とも言えないおもしろい感慨に伏した。「あの子がこうなったのか」とまるでひとごとのように思った。

With one of my best friends, Ekko (high school)
高校時代の親友のひとり、えっこと

近所の子が大きくなるのを見るように、自分のアイデンティティから離れたところで「その子」の成長を振り返っていた。そして懐かしさが「蒸発」した後に心の湖に残ったものはただただ、感謝の気持ちだった。

私が今日ここにこうしていられるのも、私の人生に関わってくださった家族、友人、先生、先輩、近所の人々や名も知らない人たちのおかげだ。その感謝の思いは滝のように降りかかり、写真に写った自分と鏡に映る自分を見て涙があふれてきた。

2021-07-26

Matsuyama Air Raids 松山空襲

American B-29 Super Fortress bomber over Nakajima Aircraft Co., Musashino Plant, Japan. On the ground, smoke marks its bombing impacts, 1945. The image is from Everett Collection at ShutterStock.com (I paid to download). All rights reserved. 全ての写真は、ShutterStock.comのEverett Collectionにて購入いたしました。ブログやSNSに掲載する許可はもらいましたが、これらの写真を許可なく転載、複製などに利用することはできません。

76 years ago, today, my grandma's town was under an air raid attack by US B-29s.

One time, I asked her what it was like, and she shared the story below.

At that time, my grandma and my grandpa were living in Dogo town in Matsuyama, Ehime, not in the mountains where she spent most of her life as a farmer. My grandpa, was not drafted into the war since he was the first son. They had a two-year-old daughter, and my grandma was pregnant with their second child.

Whenever a siren roared, the people of Matsuyama evacuated to dugouts. Matsuyama was bombed 16 times between March 1945 and August 1945, according to a historical document listed on the Ehime Shinbun Co., Ltd.

My grandma could not run fast due to her heavy body, so her neighbor, who is in her late teens, always came to grab the two-year-old daughter, my aunt named Sachiko. My grandma said that it was very helpful and appreciated. I imagine what a scary experience it must have been for anyone but especially for young children – the roaring sirens, bombs falling on their heads, and a dark, hot, dusty dugout.

On July 26, 1945, they heard the siren at 11:30 pm; they ran to the dugout. That night, my grandma was near the entrance of the dugout since she was one of the last ones to get inside. She peeked outside for a second and saw an airplane approaching. She closed the door, and then there was an earsplitting noise. Later, when it seemed safe enough to come out, people who hid there found an unexploded bomb next to the dugout. If it had exploded, the small dugout would have probably been blown up, and I would not have been here in this way. The Japanese army came to retrieve the bomb.

According to the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications, the B-29s dropped 896 tons of incendiary on that night. Survivors described it as a rain of irons and fire. People's effort to put it out was nothing against the massive fire that burned 90% of the city. 14,300 houses were burned, and 251 people died.

The scale of the damage was much smaller than the Bombing of Tokyo, which took place four months before the Matsuyama bombing. It killed approximately 105,400 people and burned more than 70,000 homes. However, regardless of the size of the attack, the fear each individual experienced in both cities must have been tremendous. The night sky of Matsuyama-city my grandma saw from Dogo town was lit up red.

Tokyo, Japan, in ruins after B-29 incendiary attacks during World War 2. The image is from Everett Collection at ShutterStock.com (I paid to download). All rights reserved. 全ての写真は、ShutterStock.comのEverett Collectionにて購入いたしました。ブログやSNSに掲載する許可はもらいましたが、これらの写真を許可なく転載、複製などに利用することはできません。

After the war, US Army troops who were stationed in Matsuyama were seen on the streets. When things settled down enough, my grandma wanted to thank the helpful young neighbor, so my grandma took the young lady to a hair salon to have her hair done. My grandma still had traditional Japanese hair at that time. When they came out of the hair salon, some US soldiers approached them and said something to my grandma. Maybe they wanted to take photos. Who knows, but my grandma was scared and felt responsible for her young companion, so she took her hand and dashed home, taking small streets that only locals knew.

Soon after the war, my grandma and her family moved back to the mountain home where my grandpa's parents lived.

My grandparents had a relative who went to the war and came home with a bullet mark in his abdomen. The bullet penetrated his body, and he survived. I vaguely remember this great-uncle. When he was happily drunk, he laughingly showed us his bullet mark. He was laughing, but as a young girl, I was thinking, "It must have hurt."

This year marks 76 years since the war ended. Now, not many survivors are around us, and the reality of the war is fading away. Therefore, I feel our responsibility (especially those of us who had the war experiencers around) to carry these stories to future generations to avert repeating the same mistake.

----------Japanese---------

Formation of B-29's releasing incendiary bombs over Japan in June 1945. The image is from Everett Collection at ShutterStock.com (I paid to download). All rights reserved. 全ての写真は、ShutterStock.comのEverett Collectionにて購入いたしました。ブログやSNSに掲載する許可はもらいましたが、これらの写真を許可なく転載、複製などに利用することはできません。

今から76年前の1945年7月今日、祖母の住んでいた町はアメリカのB-29の空襲を受けていました。

ある時、祖母にその時の様子を聞いてみたところ、以下のような話をしてくれました。

当時、祖父母は農家として人生の大半を過ごした愛媛県喜多郡内子の山の中ではなく、愛媛県松山市の道後に住んでいました。私の祖父は長男だったので徴兵されずに済んだそうです。その当時二人には2歳の娘がいて、祖母は2人目を妊娠中でした。

サイレンが鳴る度に人々は防空壕に避難しました。松山は1945年3月から8月までの間に約16回の空襲を受けたと、愛媛新聞社に掲載されている史料にあります。

祖母は妊婦の体が重くて速く走れないので、10代後半になるお隣さんの娘さんがいつも2歳の娘(私のおばさん)を抱っこしに来てくれたそうです。祖母は「とても助かった、ありがたかった」と言っていました。 誰にとっても怖い体験だったと思いますが、特に幼い子供にとってはサイレンの音、空から降ってくる焼夷弾、暑く埃っぽく暗い防空壕は恐ろしい体験だったに違いありません。

1945年7月26日、夜遅くにサイレンが鳴り人々は防空壕に走りました。その夜、私の祖母は最後に壕に入った一人だったので、壕の入り口付近にいました。一瞬、外を覗くと飛行機が近づいてくるのが見えたそうです。祖母がドアを閉めてすぐ、耳をつんざくような音がしました。しばらくして出ても大丈夫と思われてから外に出ると、壕の横に不発弾を見つけました。もし爆発していたら、小さな防空壕は吹き飛ばされていたと思うと祖母は言っていました。そして私は今ここにこのような形で存在することはなかったでしょう。後ほど日本軍がその爆弾を回収しに来たそうです。

総務省のサイトによると、その夜、B-29機は午後11時30分頃から爆弾を投下し始め、896トンの焼夷弾を投下しました。生存者はそれを「鉄と火の雨」と表現しました。火を消そうとする人々の努力は、松山市の90%を焼き尽くした大火の前ではまさに焼け石に水でした。1万4,300戸の家が焼け、251人が亡くなりました。

その4カ月前に死者約105,400人、焼失家屋は70,000棟以上にのぼった東京大空襲に比べれば、松山空襲の被害は小さいです。しかし、規模の大小にかかわらず、最中に一人一人が味わった恐怖はとてつもなく大きかったに違いありません。道後から見た松山市街方面の夜空は赤く照らされていたそうです。

戦後、松山に駐留していた米軍の部隊を街中で見かけるようになったそうです。落ち着いてきた頃、祖母はお世話になった近所の娘さんにお礼をしたく、その娘を美容院に連れて行ってあげました。祖母は当時、日本髪(丸髷だったのかな?)でした。美容院から出てくると、米軍の兵士たちが近づき祖母に何か言いました。もしかしたら、結い上げた髪が珍しく写真を撮りたかったのかもしれません。でも祖母は言葉が分からず、若い連れ合いの娘の安全に責任を感じたそうで、彼女の手を取って、地元の人しか知らないような小さな道を通って家まで走り帰ったそうです。

その後まもなく、祖母の家族は、私の祖祖父が住んでいた山の家に戻って行きました。

親戚に戦争に行った人がいて、お腹に銃弾の跡をつけて帰ってきました。弾丸は彼の体を貫通し、彼は生き延びました。その大叔父を私は何となく覚えています。楽しく酔っ払っているときに、銃弾の跡を笑いながら見せてくれました。彼は笑っていましたが、小さかった私は 「痛かっただろうな 」と思いました。

今年は終戦から76年目にあたります。今、私たちの周りには戦争を体験した人が少なくなり、戦争の現実味も薄れてきています。だからこそ、戦争体験者がまだ身の回りにいた私たちの世代(1970、1980年代生まれ)には、同じ過ちを繰り返さないためにも、このようなお話を後世に伝えていく責任があると思っています。

2021-06-09

A Call Back from the Other Side あの世からの折り返し電話


A couple of blog entries ago, I wrote about pretending to call my grandma who passed away. 

Well, she called me back. 

Before the "call back," there were a couple of attempts leading up to it. 

For instance, two days after my grandma's funeral, when I was about to fall asleep, I heard her voice calling me, "Akari-chan, Akari-chan," just the way she used to call me. I felt like she was right there. 

To her voice, I responded in my mind, "Grandma?" 

A part of me knew that I needed to stay in the half-asleep space or at the wavelength if I wanted to continue the dialogue, but I guess I had not practiced such skill enough. :-) My mind surfaced, and I fully woke up. I did not hear her anymore, but my heart was warm, feeling her invisible yet continuous existence watching over me. 

Then three weeks after her passing, I had a dream. 

In it, my phone was ringing, and without checking who was calling, I answered. To my pleasant surprise, it was my grandma. She said, "Hi Akari-chan." 

In the dream, I also knew that she had passed away. I excitedly said, "Grandma! Oh, it's SO nice to hear from you. How are you doing on that side?" 

She thoughtfully responded, "Fine, fine," and then playfully said, "I'm starting to understand how things work on this side!" 

My grandma had such a curious mind. She was fascinated to know how things work. If something broke, she wanted to try fixing it. After I came to Maui, she even started to learn some English words on her own from a book! 

I thought that her answer was so her! Her admirable curiosity was intact, and whatever it took her to "call me," she managed to do it! 

I responded, "Oh, I am so glad to hear that." 

She sounded happy and content. I don't remember anything after that, but it was enough. I stayed in bed, immersed in the echo of her voice. 

Then I came to understand that she called me back to my pretend call. She must have seen me calling her and thought, "Well, I better figure out a way to call her back."

Again and again, my heart is full of appreciation toward her and love from her, and my eyes easily fill up because of those feelings. 

Oh, life!

-----------(Japanese)----------


二つ前のブログで、亡くなったおばあちゃんに、出ないことを承知で電話をしたことを書きました。 

それからなんと、おばあちゃんから折り返し電話がありました。 

その「折り返し電話」の前に、おばあちゃんから何回かの試みがありました。 

例えば、おばあちゃんのお葬式の二日後のことです。布団に入って、「あぁ・・・眠りに落ちるぞぉ・・・」というあの独特の空間に入ったとき、「あかりちゃん、あかりちゃん」と、おばあちゃんの声がしました。まるですぐそばにいるように。

その声に、私は心の中で 「おばあちゃん?」と答えました。 そしてそのまま会話を続けるには、半分眠っているような状態で波長を合わせなければならないと思ったのですが、そういった練習が足りなかったようで、私の意識は浮上し、完全に目が覚めてしまいました。

おばあちゃんの声はもう聞こえませんでしたが、目に見えなくとも存在し続けている祖母の魂に見守られているようで、心が温かくなりました。 

そしておばあちゃんが亡くなってから3週間後、夢を見ました。

夢の中で、私の携帯電話が鳴っていました。手を伸ばし誰からの電話か確認せず出ると驚いたことに、おばあちゃんからの電話でした。

「あかりちゃん 」とまたおばあちゃんは話しかけてくれました。 夢の中でも、おばあちゃんが亡くなっていることは分かっていました。でも久しぶりにおばあちゃんの声が聞けてうれしい私は、「おばあちゃん!?」と答えました。

「おばあちゃん、元気?そちらの方はどうですか。」と言うと、おばあちゃんは「うんうん、大丈夫よ。だいぶこっちの仕組みが分かってきたよ〜。」と茶目っ気たっぷりに言いました。

おばあちゃんは、好奇心のある人でした。物の仕組みを知りたがり、何か壊れればそれを自分で直してみる人でした。私がマウイに来てからは、本を読んで英単語を学ぼうともしていました。

なので電話での答えは、おばあちゃんらしいと思いました。おばあちゃんの好奇心と探究心をもって、なんとかあちら側から私に電話をする方法を見つけてくれたようです。

私は「そっかぁ。それはよかった。」と答えました。

おばあちゃんの声は元気そうで、幸せそうでした。その後何を話したか何も覚えていないのですが、それだけで十分でした。夢から覚めた後も布団の中で、しばらくおばあちゃんの声の響きに浸っていました。

そして遅ればせながら気付いたのです。おばあちゃんが折り返し電話をしてくれていたことに!きっと、私がおばあちゃんの家に電話をするのをあちら側から見ていたのだと思います。そして「こりゃ折り返し電話してあげにゃ」と思ってくれたのだと。

私の心はまたしてもおばあちゃんからとおばあちゃんへの愛でいっぱいになり、その気持ちは私の目をぬらすのでした。

あぁ、生きるって!

2021-05-02

From Silver-lining to Blue Bird シルバーライニングからブルーバードへ

With my friend, April
友人のエイプリルと

In 20 years of my driving life, I did something for the first time - I purchased a brand new motor vehicle.

I've always liked Subaru Crosstrek, Outback, and Forester. For the past decade or so, I envisioned getting one of them someday. I liked that they are AWD and had high clearance. It helps me to go to the Hana land, which has a steep, unpaved driveway. With my old car, I could not go up the driveway when it rained.

I had always bought a used car, under $4,800 ($500 for the first one, $2,000 for the second one, and a gift for the third one (1986 Mercedes which I loved bad broke down), and $4,800 for the fourth one). This time I decided to get a new car because my old car (almost 200,000 miles) kept breaking down, and it stopped in the middle of a road twice. I was tired of being towed home and keep fixing it.

I looked at some newer used cars (not Subaru cars) with a mechanic, but I could not come to trust those cars. And used Subaru cars were almost as expensive as brand new ones.

So, for the first time in my life, I entertained the idea of becoming the first owner of a car. It was going to be the most expensive purchase to make in my adult life, so it was pretty nerve-wracking. I wanted to know every detail about the cars and the finance/loans aspect, so I did my homework.

To educate myself and compare, I've visited dealerships other than Subaru (and I genuinely considered other makers, too). And I ended up visiting the Subaru dealership on Maui four times before I signed a paper.
Signing several official papers
何枚もの書類にサインをしているところ


Each time I visited (with or without appointments), Dayne, my sales representative, did not show me a slight annoyance of "Oh, her again," and patiently answered all my questions. He said, "It's a big purchase, so it's good you're asking these questions." He was very responsive via emails and text messages as well. With all of my questions and concerns answered and addressed, I've made up my mind to get a Crosstrek.

At my fourth visit, Dayne asked me, "Now you know what model you want. What about color?"

"Color? I've been so busy deciding a model; I haven't thought about it. What are the options?"

He showed me a computer screen, and then he pointed at a car that was sitting outside the dealership, waiting to be picked up by a new owner. It was called gray khaki, but it looked like baby blue. I fell in love with it. I knew that it was the color I wanted.

Two weeks later, my car was there all the way from Japan. The day I drove my dream car home happened to be Christmas Eve of 2020. My neighbor saw my car and said, "You must have been really good this year!"

I named it "Blue Bird." When I went to the dealership to pick up Blue Bird, I traded in my old car, a 1999 Honda CR-V named Silver-lining (which did not have much value, but I did not feel comfortable selling to anyone for safety reason).

She and I were together for the past 13 years, allowing me to go places and make memories. It took me to work every day. We went camping. We went everywhere on Maui.

When I went through a sudden, painful divorce from 2011 to 2012, Silver-lining literally held a space for me. I used to drive it out to a neighborhood church cemetery at night, park next to it, and cry my heart out. I had my privacy there and did not have to think about troubling my neighbors with my crying voice. Silver-lining has witnessed me going through the darkest hours of my life; therefore, I had quite a sentiment toward the car. My heart was full of appreciation, and I had difficulty saying goodbye to it. It was my longtime friend.

I cried to let it go.
泣いてありがとう、さようなら。

When I was about to leave the dealership with Blue Bird, I asked Dayne if it was okay for me to visit Silver-lining one last time. He again did not look at me like an odd person and said, "Of course, go, go. It's good to do that."

I walked over to where it was parked, put my palms on its body, and said, "Thank you for safely transporting me to places for the past 13 years. Thank you for holding space for me. You've worked hard for all these years. I treasure our time together." Then I came back to Blue Bird, got in, started its engine, and Dayne stood outside the dealership and saw me off until I drove out of the lot.

I am thankful to my good friend, April. She came to the dealership to be available if I had any questions as I signed all the official legal papers. She had purchased a Crosstrek a few years before me, so her getting it was my inspiration, too. She took all these photos shared on this blog post for my memory. It was nice to have a friend there sharing the moment I said goodbye to my longtime friend, Silver-lining, and said hi to my new friend, Blue Bird. Thank you, April!

I will take good care of this new friend, and I look forward to making new memories with Blue Bird.

----------- (Japanese) -----------

First time sitting inside
初めて座ったところ


20年間の自動車生活の中で、私は初めて新車を購入しました。

私は以前からスバルのクロストレック、アウトバック、フォレスターが好きでした。過去15年ほど、いつかはそれらの車に乗れたらいいなぁと思っていました。AWD(All Wheel Drive)(全輪駆動車)であることと、車高が高いからです。マウイ島の東側にあるハナという地域の、舗装されていない急勾配なドライブウェイは、以前の車では雨が降ると上ることができませんでしたが、クロストレックは問題なしです。

私は過去20年間4台の車に乗りましたが、いつも4,800ドル(約48万円)以下の中古車を購入していました。(1台目は$500、2台目は$2,000、3台目はいただいた1986年製のベンツ。大好きだったけど壊れてしまった。4台目が$4,800だった。)しかし、今回は新しい車を買うことにしました。というのも、私の古い車(20万マイル近く走った)は故障が続き、2度も道の真ん中で止まってしまったのです。家まで牽引してもらって修理し続けるのにほとほと疲れました。整備士の方と一緒に売りに出ている中古車(スバル車ではない)もいくつか見ましたが、「これだ!」と思える車に出会えませんでした。しかも、スバルの中古車は新車と同じくらいの値段でした。
My old car's maintenance/repair receipts (I had up to 2008)
古い車の修理やメインテナンスの領収書
(2008年に購入したので、それからずっと持ってました)


私は初めて、自分が車の最初のオーナーになることを考えました。今までで一番高い買い物になるわけですから、かなり緊張しました。車のモデルや金融・ローンのことなど、細かいところまで知りたいと思いました。そこで、私は徹底的に下調べをしました。 知識と比較のために、スバル以外のディーラーにも足を運びました(他のメーカーも真剣に検討しました)。そして「よし!」と決めるまで、マウイ島にある唯一のスバルのディーラーに4回足を運びました。

私を担当してくれた、営業担当のDayneさんは、訪問する度に(アポイントの有無にかかわらず)、「ああ、また彼女か」というような苛立ちを微塵とも見せることなく、私の質問に根気よく答えてくれました。彼は、「大きな買い物なのだから、あかりのように色々と質問をするのは大切なことだよ 。」と言ってくれました。また、メールやテキストメッセージでの対応も非常に良かったです。私の質問や懸念にすべて答えてくれたので、私はスバルのクロストレックを購入することにしました。

4回目の来店時、Dayneは私にこう尋ねました。「これで欲しい車種が決まったね。色は何色にしますか。」

「色?今まで車種を絞ることに集中していて考えたことがありません。どんな選択肢があるのですか。」と尋ね返しました。

彼は私にコンピューターの画面を見せ、全ての選択肢を教えてくれました。それから店の外にあった、新しいオーナーが取りに来るのを待っているクロストレックを指差しました。その色の名前は「グレーカーキ」でしたが、カーキ色には見えないきれいな青空色でした。私はその色に一目惚れしました。「この色がいい!」と思いました。

2週間後、私の車は遙々日本からやってきました。夢の車を家に持ち帰った日は、たまたま2020年のクリスマスイブでした。近所の人が私の車を見て、「あかりは、今年本当に『良い子』だったのね!」と言ったので、二人で笑いました。(アメリカでは「良い子にしていないとサンタさんからのプレゼントがないよ」と子ども達に言うことがあるので。)

私はクロストレックを 「ブルーバード」と名付けました。ブルーバードを引き取りにディーラーに行ったとき、以前乗っていた1999年式のホンダCR-Vを下取りに出しました。それは「シルバーライニング 」と名付けていました。(「希望の兆し」という意味です。)(車自体に価値はほぼありませんでしたが、個人売買で売るには安全面で人様に売る気持ちになれませんでしたし、下取りで引き取ってくれるというので、例え少額でもそうしてもらいました。)

彼女と私は過去13年間一緒で、私を毎日の仕事や、キャンプや、マウイ島の色々なところに連れて行ってくれました。

2011年から2012年にかけて突然の辛い離婚を経験したとき、シルバーライニングは言葉通り私の居場所を作ってくれました。時々泣きたくなったときは、夜、近所の教会の墓地に車を走らせ、その横に駐車して、思いっきり泣いたものです。そこでは自分のプライバシーが守られ、泣き声で近所の人を心配させることもありませんでした。

シルバーライニングは、私の人生の最も暗い時期を見守ってくれたので、彼女に対してかなりの思い入れがありました。感謝の気持ちで胸がいっぱいになり、なかなか別れられませんでした。

ブルーバードを納車し、ディーラーショップを出ようとしたとき、私はDayneに「最後にシルバーライニングに挨拶しに行ってもいいですか。」と聞きました。彼はまたしても私を奇異の目で見ることなく、「もちろん、行っておいで。それが良い。」と言ってくれました。

私はシルバーライニングが停まっているところまで行き、そのボディに手のひらを当て、「この13年間、私を安全にいろいろなところへ連れて行ってくれて、ありがとうございました。私に泣く場所を作ってくれて、ありがとうございました。今までほんとうに頑張ってくれたねぇ。一緒に過ごした思い出を大切にしするね。」そう話しかけながら、また涙が溢れてきました。

その後ブルーバードに戻り、乗り込んでエンジンをかけると、Dayneは私が駐車場を出るまで見送ってくれました。

親友のエイプリルにも感謝しています。彼女は、私が正式な書類にサインする際に、何か質問があったときのため、ディーラーショップに一緒に来てくれました。彼女は私よりも数年前にクロストレックを購入していたので、彼女がクロストレック手に入れたことも私のインスピレーションになりました。この投稿に使っている写真は、彼女が撮ってくれたものです。長年の友人であったシルバーライニングに別れを告げ、新しい友人となるブルーバードに挨拶する瞬間を見届けてくれる友人がいてくれて良かったです。エイプリル、ありがとう!

車という名の色々なところへ連れて行ってくれる道具を大切にしていきたいと思います。ブルーバードと新しい思い出を作るのが楽しみです。

2021-04-25

Love Blossoming and Roaring 花咲かせ叫ぶ(おらぶ)愛


The day after my grandma's funeral (it was held on June 10, 2020; I attended virtually), I felt like calling my grandma's landline, knowing that she would not answer.

I just wanted to pretend to call her. Also, I knew that her landline would be canceled, so I wanted to call the number one last time. I listened to the same, usual ringing tone, thinking she would have answered the phone only a few days ago. 

Everyone, who called her, knew that you had to ring it for a while to give her enough time to get to the phone. So, it was my custom to listen to the ringing tone for some time. As I listened to it, I could vividly imagine her voice answering, "Hello?" 

Then, to my surprise, the ringing sound ceased, and a man's voice said, "Hello?" My first guess was my dad because he was there often. The day before grandma passed away, he was helping her doing some yard work. But, it did not sound like my dad, and the voice did not sound like any of my uncles, so I perplexedly asked, "Excuse me, but I don't recognize this voice. This is Akari. May I ask with whom I am speaking now?"

Then the man said, "It's me, your dad." 
"Oh, dad? Really? It didn't sound like you."
"You, too. You didn't sound like you. For a moment, I thought it was a "Me, Me" scam call." (In Japan, unfortunately, there have been incidents of young people calling older people, pretending to be their grandchildren by saying, "It's me, grandma, it's me," and asking for money.)

I jokingly told him, "This is your daughter, who passes gas around you without any hesitation." He laughed and said, "Now I know it's truly you!" (I am not sure if I like this way of verification, though :-D)

He said that he went to the grandma's house to take care of things like cooked rice, which she cooked but did not get to eat, and some laundry hanging outside. She had washed the work clothes he wore to help her the day before she died. 

I pictured him touching every item that his mother had touched only a few days ago. My heart got squeezed a little. The heart squeeze was probably also had to do with seeing myself in him dealing with the same thing someday. 

My maternal grandparents passed away when I was in my late teens. Due to lack of life experience, I don't think I was there for my mom the way I would now as a 38-year-old person. And I was too young to realistically imagine myself going through what she was going through in my near future. 

My dad and I spoke for about an hour. My dad and I usually talk once a week, but it was the longest we spoke. It was nice to talk about someone we dearly loved. 

At the end of the phone talk, painfully recognizing that people we dearly love will not exist forever, I felt the strong urge, so I followed it and told him, "Dad, I want you to know that I love you so much, and I am grateful to be your daughter." 

I started to cry as I said the first few words, feeling overwhelmed by love toward him and from him. When emotions surpass our words, tears come up. My grandma birthed my wonderful father and raised him. Then he met my wonderful mother, and they birthed me. 

As I hang up the phone, I felt theirs and my ancestors' love blossoming and roaring in my bloodstream. 

"Live! Live! Live! Love! Love! Love!" cheered and implored souls who have come and gone.

"Yes! Yes! Yes!" I cried back to their call.

Other posts about grandma:

(The photo of the phone above was taken by Alex Andrews. The photo of grandma below was taken by me.)

------------(Japanese)-----------
 
(She was cleaning green onions.)

2020年6月10日の祖母の葬儀の翌日、私は祖母が出ないことを承知で祖母の家の固定電話に電話をかけてみました。

ただ、電話するふりをしたかったのです。また祖母の家の固定電話は解約される予定だったので、その前にもう一度その番号にかけておきたかったのです。いつもと同じ呼び出し音を聞きながら、「つい先日までは、おばあちゃん電話に出たのになぁ。」確かに祖母はいたのに、今はもういない。そのことがとても不思議に感じられました。

祖母は電話に出られるまでしばらく時間がかかることがあるので、祖母に電話をする人は皆、しばらく鳴らす必要があることを知っていました。なので、私もしばらく呼び出し音を聞くのが習慣になっていました。呼び出し音を聞きながら、おばあちゃんの「はい」と電話に出る声がいとも簡単にありありと想像できました。もう少しだけ鳴らして電話を切るつもりでした。

すると驚いたことに、呼び出し音が止まり、「もしもし」という男性の声が聞こえました。父は祖母の家によく行っていたので、最初は父だと思いました。祖母の亡くなる前日も、畑仕事を手伝っていました。しかしなぜか父の声に聞こえず、伯父の声でもなかったので、私は戸惑いながら、「すみませんが・・・どなた様でしょうか。私はあかりです。」と言いました。

するとその声は、「お父さんです。あかりのお父さん。」と言いました。
「あ〜、お父さんやったん?お父さんの声に聞こえんかった。」
「そっちも、あかりの声に聞こえんかった。一瞬、おれおれ詐欺の電話かと思った。」
「ハハハ。私はお父さんの近くで平気でおならをする娘ですよ。」
「あぁ!本当にあかりや。」
(そんな認証方式ちょっとイヤだけど。)

父は葬儀の後、祖母の家に行って、炊いたままになっているご飯や、外に干してある洗濯物を取り込んだり、家の用事をしていました。洗って干されていた洗濯物の中には、祖母の亡くなる前日に父が畑仕事を手伝った際に着ていた作業着もあったそうです。

父がそうやって、ほんの数日前に自分のお母さんが触れた物に触れている様子を目に浮かべ、胸が締め付けられる思いがしました。父の姿にいつか来る私自身の姿を見たからかもしれません。

私の母方の祖父母は私が10代後半のときに亡くなりました。その頃の私はまだ人生経験が少なかったため、母が自分の両親を亡くしたことに対し、38歳の今の私のようには寄り添えてあげられなかったように思います。そして母の姿に自分を重ねて見ることはまだできないほど若かったです。きっと母も母の両親の物々に触れる度に「ここにいたのになぁ」と想ったことでしょう。

父と私は、1時間ほど電話越しで話をしました。父とはたいてい週に一度電話で話すのですが、この日はきっと今までで一番長く話したと思います。二人にとって共通の大切だった人のことを話せてよかったです。

そしてその大切な人たちはいつまでもいるわけではないことを想い、恥ずかしいけれど恥ずかしがっている場合じゃないと思い、電話の最後に「お父さん、あかりはお父さんのこと大好きだよ。お父さんの娘として生まれてこれたことを感謝してるよ。そのことを知っておいてね。」と伝えました。

伝えながら涙が溢れてきました。感情が言葉を凌駕するとき涙が溢れます。父に対する愛と、父から私へ注がれる愛が涙という形になって溢れてきたのだと思います。祖母は父を生み育て、やがて父は母に出会い、私はその二人から生まれました。

電話を切った後、祖母の、両親の、そしてそこに命を繋げてくださったご先祖さまたちの愛が、私のからだを巡る血潮の中で咆吼するがごとく開花していくのを感じました。

「生きろ!愛せ!」とこの世に来て去っていった命たちがエールを送ってくれました。

そのエールに、私は泣きながら「イエス!イエス!」と応えたのでした。

祖母に関する他のブログ記事:

2021-04-18

Ordering Costumes and Saree 衣装とサリーを注文




This week happened to be a week to order my students' Odissi costumes and cotton saree for practice.

Two students who have been studying with me for the past 4, 5 years started wishing, "Someday, we'd like to have our costumes." We felt that the time has ripened to get one. It means a lot to have your own dance attire. One is that it means that a dancer has worked hard to the point and that she/he is committing her/himself to further learning.

I asked one of my teachers, Guru Vishnu Tattva Das of San Francisco, where/how I could get costumes (I got mine more than 10 years ago). Within five minutes of inquiry, one of his students, Mansi called me. I had met Mansi at Vishnuji's class in San Francisco before. She said that his students just placed an order, and I could squeeze in my students' order, too. What great timing! That night, I had a class with my students, so it was excellent timing in that sense, too.

Mansi sent me a measurement sheet. I printed it out and helped my students measure 16 different sections of their bodies. Then they picked two colors. Mansi sent us pictures of saree based on their color choice. Then my students chose the saree they liked. Then the order was officially placed.

Mansi has been the point of contact with tailors in Orissa (or written as Odisha) (where Odissi dance originated) in India for many years. She is from Bhubaneswar, Orissa, and speaks their language, Oriya. We were very grateful for her kindness in letting us squeeze in our order. We kept her up late until 1 am California time. (She wanted to place the order that evening to ensure that the tailors begin working on it to meet the shipping date.) Sorry to keep you so late and thank you so much, Mansi! When I apologized, she wrote back, "I am glad I could help other dancers."

My teacher, Sarala Dandekar's, and Vishnuji' have been sister/brother dance schools, so Mansi is like our "cousins." What a lovely dance cousin she is!

Also, this week, I ordered cotton practice saree for my beginner students from a company called Classical Dance Jewelry. They chose the colors they like. It is fun choosing a color. :-) They will begin dancing in saree!

For me, witnessing my students getting Odissi costumes or saree is like watching my precious children/sisters being wedded. It is touching to see. 

(Odissi dance is a temple dance, and dancers were considered married to gods a long time ago.) (I am not religious, but I respect all religions in the world, and I do believe in the source beyond, behind, and all around us.)

(Mansi just sent me the photos below. Wow, they're coming together!)

-----------(Japanese)----------



今週は期せずして、生徒さんたちのオディッシィダンスの衣装と、練習用のサリーを注文する週となりました。

過去4、5年私のもとで習ってくださっている生徒さんお二人は、何ヶ月前から「いつか自分の衣装を持ちたい」と思い始めました。私たちは時が熟したのを感じました。自分の衣装を持つというのは、大きな意味を持ちます。一つはそこまでがんばったということ。もう一つは更なる学びに再度身と心を引き締めるということ。

今週の火曜日、私の先生の一人である、サンフランシスコにお住まいのヴィシュヌ・タットゥバ・ダス先生に最近はどこで購入できるかお尋ねしたところ(私は10年以上前に購入したので)、先生にメッセージを送った5分以内に、ヴィシュヌ先生の生徒さんのお一人のマンシーさんから電話がありました。なんと丁度ヴィシュヌ先生の生徒さん達が衣装を注文したばかりで、今日であれば私の生徒達の分も追加注文できるとのこと。まぁ、なんて素晴らしいタイミング。そして私の生徒さんたちのクラスもその日の夜あったので、その面でも良いタイミングでした。

マンシーさんが採寸シートを送ってくれました。私はそれを印刷し、生徒さん二人の身体の様々な箇所を計16カ所採寸しました。そして二人は自分の好きな色を二つ選びました。それに基づいてマンシーさんがサリーの写真を送ってくれました。その中から二人は「これだ!」と思うサリーを選び、それをもって注文過程は終了しました。

マンシーさんは長年、インドのオリッサ州(もしくはオリッシャと表記)(オディッシィダンスの発祥の地)にいる仕立屋さんと連絡を取る役割を担ってくださっています。彼女自身オリッサ州のブバネシュワー出身で、オリッサの言語であるオリヤ語を話されるのです。ギリギリで私たちの注文まで何とかねじ込んでくださったマンシーさんの厚意に感謝です。サンフランシスコ時間で朝の1時まで対応してくださいました。(先に注文されていた衣装が発送される日に間に合うよう、その晩のうちに仕立屋さんに注文をしたかったとのこと。)マンシーさん、ご迷惑おかけしました!そして本当にありがとうございました。「朝1時まで引き留めてしまってすみません」とメールを送ると「他の踊り子さんのお手伝いができてうれしいわ」とのこと。

私の先生のサララ・ダンデカー先生とヴィシュヌ先生は兄妹弟子なので、お二人の学校は姉妹校であり、つまりマンシーさんと私は「従姉妹弟子」にあたります。なんてすてきな「ダンスシスター」ならぬ、「ダンスカズン」でしょうか。

また今週、初級クラスの生徒さんたちの練習用の木綿のサリーも注文をしました。みなさん自分の好きな色を選びました。色選びは楽しいです。これからはサリーを着ての練習開始です!

私にとって生徒さんたちが踊りの衣装やサリーを手に入れる様は、まるで自分の大切な娘や妹が嫁いでいくのを見るようで感慨深いものがあります。

(オディッシィダンスは寺院で生まれた踊りです。昔、寺院の踊り手は神に嫁ぎました。私は信仰する宗教はありませんが、世界の宗教を尊敬し、私たちの自我を超えた私たちと常に共にある・いる「何か」は信じています。)

(上の二枚の写真は、このブログを書いている今、マンシーさんが送ってくださったものです。わー、形になってきた!)

2021-04-11

I hope to live up to her love 祖母の愛に見合えますように


(Photo by Hiroyuki Kuma at Uchikoza, Ehime, Japan)


When we hit our pinky toe against a corner of the furniture, we curl up, focus on our breaths, and disperse the pain in our mind and body, right?

Well, that's what I did for two weeks in June 2020 because my grandmother passed away.

A solid rock in my heart fell off, and there was void. When I moved, the wind blew in the hole, and it hurt. I observed myself going through this human experience called grief.

I wanted to be happy for her, for she had lived a full life, and I knew that she is now everywhere, and I can "see" her anytime. But sadness was sadness, and it had to be experienced.

As sad as I was, I was grateful for the experience as it pushed my envelope. Perhaps, it will make me better at relating to others who lost their loved ones. Perhaps, it will add a new color to my "life palette" and let me draw a new "painting."

I knew she would go someday as she was 96 years old.

In January 2020, when I saw her in Japan, I felt that her "candle" inside her was getting shorter and dimmer. I had a slight notion that it might become the last time I see her, so I hugged her and told her, "Grandma, thank you for passing your life onto me. Thank you for loving me." I’ve done it for the past ten years each time I left Japan, but I did it again with all my sincerity. 

So, I thought I had prepared myself for the finality, but when I found it out from my dad, my mind froze for a second, and it took me some time to grok what it meant.

She went while she was cleaning onions she had harvested. She was doing something she loved until the very end while she lived by herself in Japan's rural mountain. She was truly my role model and hero.

Last year, I allowed myself to take time to come to terms with her death.

Now, when I cry, it's not due to the sadness of not being able to hug her in the three-dimensional form. It is due to overwhelming appreciation toward her - the life she has passed on to me and the love she has poured over me. 

I hope to live up to her love.


---------(Japanese)---------

(Grandma and me age 2)
(祖母と2歳の私)


足の小指を家具の角などにぶつけたとき、体を丸めて呼吸に集中して、じーっと痛みを分散させようとしますよね。

2020年6月に祖母が亡くなった後、2週間ほどそのようにして生活を送りました。

心の中に確固としてあった岩が落ち、そこに空洞ができました。動くと、その穴に風が吹き込み痛みを伴うのでした。悲しみながらも、「悼む」という、この世に生まれてきたからこそ味わえる感情を経験をしている自分を観察しました。

人生を全うした祖母のためにも祖母の人生を祝いたかったですし、今は祖母はどこにもいて、いつでも「会える」ことは分かっていました。しかし悲しみは悲しみであり、味わうしかありませんでした。

悼みながらも、この経験に感謝しました。これから先、誰かの大切な方が亡くなったとき、もう少し上手により寄り添うことができるようになるかもしれません。また、人生経験というパレットにも新たな色が加わって、新しい絵が描けるようになるかもしれませんから。

祖母は96歳だったので、近い将来逝く日が来ることは分かっていました。

2020年1月、日本で祖母と過ごしたとき、彼女の中にある「ろうそく」が短くなって、その灯りが小さくなっているのを感じました。これが最後になるかもしれないと思い、祖母の小さい体に腕を回し、「おばあちゃん、あかりに命を繋げてくれてありがとう。あかりはおばあちゃんのことが大好きよ。」と。10年ほど前からやっていたことでしたが、今回も心を込めて伝えました。

なので、できるだけの心の準備はしていたつもりでしたが、父から連絡をもらったときは、一瞬頭と心が固まってしまい、その「意味」を咀嚼して飲み込むのに時間がかかりました。

祖母は自分の畑で採れた玉ねぎをきれいにしている最中に逝ったようです。日本の田舎の山の中で一人で暮らしながら、最後まで自分の好きなことをしていたのです。そんな祖母はまさに私の師範であり、ヒーローでした。

昨年、私はゆっくりと祖母の死を受け入れました。

今涙を流すときは、悲しみからではありません。それよりも、祖母が私につないでくれた命や私に注いでくれた愛に対し、感謝の気持ちが溢れ、その溢れが涙となって現れます。

祖母がくれた愛に見合えるよう生きていけますように。

2021-04-05

A New Beginning 新しい始まり



I started my blog back in 2006.

There was no Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

To stay in touch with my family and friends overseas, I relied on email. I used to think, "Wouldn't it be nice if f there was a platform where I could post photos and write, and my friends and family can go there to see what I'm up to whenever they want?" 

Then I learned that there was this thing called a blog! So, I started one.

Then in 2014, I stopped, not because I wanted to stop. I simply did not have time and could not afford to carve out time. 

In 2014, I made a fairly big decision to leave my full-time school teacher position - a secure income source. (I will write about that time another time.) I started building my own business

For the past seven years, I have put my head down and hustled. Thanks to every mentor, friend, and customer/client, my "then-baby" (a.k.a my business) has been growing. It is like the "baby" is starting to go to a preschool, and I can have a little more time to myself!

Although my business is still growing, and I have a new exciting project coming up (I will announce soon), I finally seem to be able to pop my head out of the water and breath. 

So, I decided to resume my blog. 

Although I didn't plan on it, I feel auspicious being able to start a new thing in this season filled with new lives.

(Photo above is an orchid pot given to me by my student, and it's been flowering every year - a reminder of time and growth.)



-------(Japanese)-------

2006年にブログを始めました。
その頃はまだツイッターも、Facebookも、Instagramもない時代でした。

海外の家族や友人とは、主にEmailを使って近況報告をしていました。その頃、「どこか、写真を上げられて文章を書けるようなプラットホームがあったらいいのになぁ。そしたら、家族や友人が好きなときにそこに行ってもらったら、私の近況が分かるというようなものが・・・。」と思っていました。

そんな矢先にブログというものが存在することを知り、早速始めたのでした。

そして2014年にブログを中断しました。止(や)めようと思って止めたのではないのですが、シンプルに時間を取れなくなってしまったからです。

というのも2014年にある大きな決断をしました。それまではフルタイムの小学校教員として働いていました。その仕事を辞めました。つまり安定した収入もなくなりました。(その時のことについてはまた別の機会に書きたいと思います。)

過去七年間は、自分のビジネスを起こし育てることで手が一杯でした。脇目も振らず(というか振れず)、無我夢中でやってきたという感じです。そんな「赤ちゃん」であった私のビジネスも、有り難いことに、先輩方や、友人や、一人一人のお客様のおかげで成長を遂げて参りました。そして感覚としては幼稚園に上がるところまで来たという感じでしょうか。なので、幼稚園に行っている間は自分のことができる!

まだまだ成長真っ只中、今もまさに新しいことを始めようとしているところですが(詳細は後日ご紹介)、ここに来てやっと水面下から顔を出して息をつけるようになりました。

なので、ブログを再開することにしました。

意図したわけではないのですが、ちょうど新しい命が芽吹くこの季節に、また新しい一歩を踏めることをうれしく思います。

(上の写真は、ある生徒さんがくれた毎年咲いてくれる蘭の花です。見る度に、時間と成長について想わせてくれます。)